In search for the perfect Chicagohenge

E. Wacker Drive and N. Michigan Ave., 2018
Washington from MIllennium Park, 2015

Chicagohenge is the Chicago version of “Manhattanhenge,” according to Bleader which first mentioned the phenomena in 2009. In that blog post, the author, Whet Moser said, “Manhattanhenge is a biannual occurrence in which the setting sun aligns with the east-west streets of Manhattan’s main street grid. Naturally, it works here in Chicago as well…”

Since then, photographers of every kind gather in the most popular places where the Chicagohenge could be seen. Back in 2010 to about 2013, I practically was the only one standing on the “ledge” in Millennium Park overlooking Washington St. photographing the henge – during the March and September equinoxes. (I remember explaining to passers by what was going on and they would stop and photograph as well.) But starting 2014, when TV and the Chicago Tribune started to cover the phenomenon, tens if not hundreds of photographers started to gather in the location (as well as a similar one facing Madison), that it sometimes becomes impossible to find a good viewpoint unless you go there early.

But there are other locations from which you can photograph Chicago henge. I’ve been photographing it since 2010.

Here a sampling of Chicagohenge throughout the years.

The women of Jerusalem

Photographer photographing the women of Pilsen playing as the women of Jerusalem in the community’s passion play reenacting the Via Crucis (Stations of the Cross) on the Via Dolorosa in the streets of Pilsen, a predominant Latino community in Chicago’s southwest side.

The Via Dolorosa is a street within the Old City of Jerusalem, believed to be the path that Jesus walked on the way to his crucifixion.